7 Tips for Working Out Fatigue

In a Standford University study, cycling helped cut the time insomniacs needed to fall asleep by nearly half. Here, Texas Mutual president and CEO Rich Gergasko (right) and Randy Johnson, senior vice president of investments, take a well-deserved break after completing the annual MS 150 bike ride.

In a Standford University study, cycling helped cut the time insomniacs needed to fall asleep by nearly half. Here, Texas Mutual president and CEO Rich Gergasko (right) and Randy Johnson, senior vice president of investments, take a well-deserved break after completing the annual MS 150 bike ride.

Visions of a beach-ready body are all the motivation some of us need to run that extra mile or squeeze out a few more pushups. For others, avoiding obesity, diabetes, heart disease and other chronic diseases is the carrot that gets us off the couch and on the stationary bike.

If swimsuit season and a longer life aren’t enough motivation to break a sweat, consider this: Exercise can help you ward off fatigue.

Of course, when you’re tired, a good nap likely trumps a brisk walk. But if you can muster the motivation to get moving, you just might find yourself refreshed and ready to tackle the rest of your day.

More than 90 percent of studies show that sedentary people who complete a regular exercise program report reduced fatigue. The benefits of exercise prove even greater than those of stimulant medications.

If you want to reap the benefits of exercise, you have to make it a lifestyle. Some experts will tell you it takes 22 days to create a habit. Others say 66 days. What matters most is day one. Here are some basic tips for introducing physical activity into your daily grind:

  1. Consult your physician. The Mayo Clinic suggests you talk to your doctor before starting an exercise program. Together, you can create a plan that is right for you.
  2. Start slowly. To maintain cardiovascular health, the American Heart Association recommends at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity at least 5 days per week, or at least 25 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity at least 3 days per week. Don’t think of exercise as an all-or-nothing endeavor, though. With your doctor’s guidance, start slowly and build as your stamina increases.
  3. Take a brisk walk to ward off a post-meal crash.
  4. Eat a light snack 45 minutes to an hour before you exercise.
  5. Mix it up. If you limit your exercise to one or two activities, you are more likely to get bored. And boredom can derail the best-laid plans to get fit. Choose a good mix of the four basic exercises: aerobic, strength, flexibility and balance.
  6. When doing strength training, choose exercises that target multiple muscle groups, such as pushups and lunges.
  7. Allow time to recover. If you experience irritability, anxiety, delayed recovery, decreased interest in exercise or other signs of overtraining, your body might be telling you it needs a break.

Missed our other posts?
This is the third in a series of four posts showing how a commitment to wellness can help workers manage fatigue. If you missed our previous posts, click the links to read them:

Sleep Well

Eat Your Way to a Healthier, More Energetic You

Up next
In our last post in this series, we’ll share some tips for managing stress and the fatigue that often accompanies it.

More information on wellness
Worker health and safety are inseparable. Healthy workers tend to get injured less, and when they do get injured, they recover faster. For more information on the symbiotic relationship between health and safety, click on these links:

Why Wellness Matters in Workers’ Comp

10 Tips for Integrating Health and Safety

Worker Health and Safety: A Symbiotic Relationship

The Business Case for Employee Wellness Programs

3 Tips for a Healthier, Safer You

Make Wellness Part of Your Benefits Package

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: